creamy fusilli with zucchini

Pasta is like a blank canvas. It can adapt to all moods, all ingredients, and all seasons. You can open your pantry/fridge and start pulling things out, add some pasta, and just like that, what was once a motley crew of ingredients is now a meal.

Of course, as in any civilized society, there are rules that one can choose to either obey or disobey. For the most part, the rules are pretty intuitive, and at the end of the day the dish will probably still be delicious, even if you do pair capellini with meat sauce like some kind of unstoppable maverick.

I’m  not such a rebel, and anyways it’s still way too warm for meat sauce. I’ve been buying zucchini non-stop since I’ve been here, and using it primarily as a pizza topping and a side dish. Then I came across a Roasted Zucchini Pasta on Ezra Pound Cake, and I couldn’t believe I had never thought to combine my two addictions into one amazing meal. How (fu)silly of me (sorry, had to!)

I didn’t actually roast the zucchini, I sauteed it in a pan with some onion, sliced garlic, dill and crushed red peppers. Also, I didn’t use goat cheese or parmesan, but opted instead for some herb cream cheese that I had hanging out in my fridge. It turned out to be delicious, with a little subtle tang from the cream cheese.  Next time, I’ll definitely try it with the goat cheese though!

But look, there is more to Italy than delicious food. Especially here in Rome, history is everywhere. Even beyond the big tourist attractions, you can find little pieces of antiquity scattered in the midst of all the modernity. What I love about this city is that history is never sacrificed for the sake of building something new; they quite literally build around their ruins. One such example is Il Teatro di Pompeo (Theater of Pompey).

Considered the original Roman theatre, this site is most famous for the assassination that took place right here. The victim’s name? His followers called him Caesar, but his friends probably just called him Julius. Actually, if memory serves, they probably called him Julī , as per the rules of the Latin vocative case.

Nowadays, this site occupies the heart of the Largo di Torre Argentina. Surrounding it, however, are shops, restaurants, and a major bus and tram stop. Every morning as they board their buses to work, countless friends, Romans and countrymen can check out the location of the murder that has been so immortalized through art and literature. But they aren’t the only ones who love to gaze at these ruins:

The ruins of the theatre have also become a cat sanctuary, home to many Roman gatti. And you thought Broadway was the only place you could see Cats onstage!

Creamy Fusilli with Zucchini recipe (adapted from Ezra Pound Cake)

  • 1 cup dried Fusilli pasta
  • 1 zucchini, chopped
  • 1/4 white onion, chopped
  • 1 tsp. crushed red peppers
  • 1/2 tsp. dried dill weed
  • 1 clove garlic, sliced (minced or grated would also work)
  • 2 oz. cream cheese
  • salt to taste
  • olive oil for sauteing

Set pasta to boil. In a separate pan, add olive oil, then zucchini, onions and garlic. Saute for 1-2 minutes. Add red peppers and dill and continue to saute until zucchini and onions reach desired level of “done-ness” (I prefer both a little crispy, but if softer consistencies are desired, then allow both to cook for longer).

Once pasta is cooked, drain, but reserve 1-2 Tbsp. of pasta water in a separate dish. Combine pasta and sauteed vegetables, and immediately mix in cream cheese. The heat from the pasta and zucchini will melt the cream cheese. If pasta still seems a little too dry, add pasta water in small amounts until desired consistency is achieved. Add salt to taste.

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6 thoughts on “creamy fusilli with zucchini

  1. This looks delicious, especially when the ingredients are fresh from Campo dei Fiori! And I love the cats at Largo Argentina, they’ll crawl on your lap if you eat around them lol, good pics!

  2. BRILLIANTLY WRITTEN !! especially the part about ” cats on stage ” !! Love it ……photos , recipe and ALL . Ciao Bella .

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